It’s the start of Poison Prevention week! Take a look at these household items that can be poisonous to your pet. Keep in mind that the below items are only a few of the many household dangers to pets.

Dog Poisons:

Human Medication


  • While Advil or over-the-counter medications can help us feel better, it does not have the same effect on pets. Prescription drugs and antidepressants can cause elevated heart rate, seizures, high blood pressure, kidney failure, and even death.

Rodenticides

  • Rodenticides are easy for dogs to get a hold of. The main types of rodenticides contain warfarin, brodifacoum, diphacinone, and bromethalin. The threat to a dog’s health when ingesting rodenticides are anticoagulants. Ingesting these chemicals can increase seizures and paralysis in dogs, as well as tissue mineralization.

Plants

  • Perhaps one of the easiest items for a dog to accidentally ingest is a plant. Toxic plants to dogs include apple trees, aloe, holly, lilies, daffodils, azaleas, baby’s breath, bird of paradise, daisies, carnations, cherry plants, chives, bamboo, hibiscus and more.

Cat Poisons:

Insecticides

  • You’ll often find cats munching on indoor and outdoor plants, but even indoor plants sprayed with herbicides can be fatal if ingested. Also, the bait contains methomyl which can lead to respiratory arrest in cats.

Human Medication

  • Almost one-quarter of phone calls to the ASPCA regard pets ingesting human medication. One of the most common human pills that poses a threat to cats is ibuprofen. Ingestion can cause kidney failure and stomach ulcers. Aleve is another medication that contains naproxen which can be fatal to cats even when ingested in small amounts.

Lilies

  • Some lilies cause irritating reactions, such as tissue damage to the mouth, tongue, pharynx, and esophagus – this results in minor drooling. The more dangerous, potentially fatal lilies are true lilies and not the variation.

If you suspect your pet has ingested any of the above toxins, please contact your veterinarian immediately 719-593-1336 or Pet Poison Control 855-764-766 ($59 USD per incident fee applies)

References
“Common Household Dangers for Pets.” RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Oct. 2016.
“PetMD, LLC.” Poisoning in Dogs. PetMD, n.d. Web. 26 Oct. 2016.
“10 Dog Poisons: Plants, Foods, Medicines, and More.” WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 26 Oct. 2016.
“10 Poison Pills” for Pets.” AVMA, n.d. Web. 26 Oct. 2016.
“Top 10 Pet Poisons – Top Ten Dog and Cat Poisons – Pet Poison Helpline.” Pet Poison Helpline. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Oct. 2016.
“Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants.” ASPCA. ASPCA, n.d. Web. 25 Oct. 2016.